Jan 11th Cause and Effects

Most of films are character-driven.

Within a film’s formal system, characters make things happen and respond to event. Their actions and reactions contribute strongly to our engagement with the film.

Why does these character-centered stories are dominate in right now film industry? Because film is like a building, a Matrix, a network of different elements. When we watch a film, we are following the film’s internal logic, we follow the rules within that specific film, and we build a coherent visual.

The Importance of Characters:

Unlike characters in novels, film characters typically have a visible body. And even sometimes, one character may be embodied by different actresses to suggest the different sides of that character.

A character has traits: attitudes, skills, habits, tastes, psychological drives and other qualities that distinguish the character. When a character has possessed several varying traits, some at odds with others, but we tend to call the character complex or three-dimensional.

For example: Sherlock Holmes is a mess of traits.

And always at most, father-son relationship dominates the theme in movies. A boy is to become a man, he has to become a father. In most cases, action plots are interactive with love plots within each movie.

To build a character, first need to give him/her as many problems as possible. He should be moved by reasons, his external or internal drives. All basic situation should be bad, then the character needs to take action, in this way, a story will start.

The Hero’s Journey

The Hero’s Journey is a pattern of narrative identified by the American scholar Joseph Campbell that appears in drama, storytelling, myth, religious ritual, and psychological development.  It describes the typical adventure of the archetype known as The Hero, the person who goes out and achieves great deeds on behalf of the group, tribe, or civilization.

Its stages are:

1. THE ORDINARY WORLD. 

The hero, uneasy, uncomfortable or unaware, is introduced sympathetically so the audience can identify with the situation or dilemma.  The hero is shown against a background of environment, heredity, and personal history.  Some kind of polarity in the hero’s life is pulling in different directions and causing stress.

2. THE CALL TO ADVENTURE. 

Something shakes up the situation, either from external pressures or from something rising up from deep within, so the hero must face the beginnings of change. 

3. REFUSAL OF THE CALL. 

The hero feels the fear of the unknown and tries to turn away from the adventure, however briefly.  Alternately, another character may express the uncertainty and danger ahead.

4. MEETING WITH THE MENTOR. 

The hero comes across a seasoned traveler of the worlds who gives him or her training, equipment, or advice that will help on the journey.  Or the hero reaches within to a source of courage and wisdom.

5. CROSSING THE THRESHOLD. 

At the end of Act One, the hero commits to leaving the Ordinary World and entering a new region or condition with unfamiliar rules and values. 

6. TESTS, ALLIES AND ENEMIES. 

The hero is tested and sorts out allegiances in the Special World.

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